Designing a Digital Experience | AICC BoxScore

Cameron Christie Uncategorised

Share this Post

Designing an Experience


First Published Aug 7, 2017 at AICC BoxScore

Original Article

Box Manufacturing
“With digital, we are able to design and deliver a highly customized mock-up POP display before we even meet with the customer, so it’s completely ready for them to see when they come in.”Rick Van Poele

Back in 2012, Ideon Packaging ventured into the digital world with the purchase of an HP Scitex FB7600 press. We have since upgraded to HP’s 15500 corrugated press, complemented by two ESKO Kongsberg (XP and XPA) cutting tables.

With the addition of digital, and being an early adopter of the technology, we have been able to carve out a new market in our local packaging industry for digitally produced packaging and POP solutions.

In a recent article on Ideon’s digital print capabilities, our President and CEO Rick Van Poele explains that “with digital, we are able to design and deliver a highly customized mock-up POP display before we even meet with the customer, so it’s completely ready for them to see when they come in.”

Designing an experience is likely the most impactful element that digital brings to our business.

Rick goes on to say that “most brands have realized package design needs to be dynamic to entice customers, but many are now realizing that the concept has to extend to a memorable and unique POP display, in order to engage with the customer on a personal and emotional level.”

Designing an Experience

Designing an Experience is likely the most impactful element that digital brings to our business, and it also happens to be one of the primary deliverables of design for any product or service. Whether through variable print or data within an order, changing structure or graphics without additional tooling costs for the customer, or being able to do test or soft launches without sacrificing brand imaging, Ideon can create a brand experience for our customers—and their customers—that they get excited about. Think back to the groundbreaking products we have seen in recent years; they were all cases in which the experience created by the new product had not existed previously and broke customers’ existing paradigms—the iPod to music and Tesla Model S to automobiles, to name a couple. Digital allows us to do the same with packaging on a rapid and repeatable scale.

Design-driven sales

Design-driven sales is an extension of designing an experience. Our design team regularly partners with our sales team to target certain customers and create a POP display that is a complete shift from what they’re currently getting. Our structure and graphic teams are given creative control to create a “wow!” experience. In some cases, we’re in a competitive situation, and in others the customer is not currently buying POP due to legacy paradigms. In either scenario, we come in with a full-production prototype, and customers instantly understand how they can benefit from digital. In some cases, potential customers have placed orders for the exact prototype our design team created. We brought them something they didn’t realize they wanted or didn’t know was possible.

A Shift in Paradigms

A shift in paradigms and educating the market has been one of the bigger hurdles for us. Externally, we have needed to educate customers on the advantages and benefits of digital compared to what they previously thought was possible, open their understanding to letting their imaginations run wild from one order to the next, and engage marketing departments in the sales process. Internally, the design process itself is a lot different than in traditional corrugated, with electronic workflow and rapid version control needing to be a focus.

I would be remiss if I didn’t put a lean spin on this digital topic. Granted, digital is not for everyone, and like all packaging solutions, digital has its fit. But in the area of small- to medium-run POP, container variations, and other forms of packaging, digital will help reduce waste for the benefit of your customers.

  • Reduced or eliminated inventory—buying exactly what is needed, no more tooling (good for you and your customer).
  • Reduced waiting—shorter production lead times.
  • Increased value—Superior print quality over flexo, stock, and other short- to medium-run POP options.

 

Mike Nunn
VP | Operations

Thank You Steve

Cameron Christie Article, Event

Share this Post

The Guru has left the building! Steve Baier was instrumental in helping create the culture that exists today at Ideon. We wish Steve all the best in his retirement and thank him for his contributions during the first 15 years of Ideon; you will be greatly missed.



“It’s like teaching a pig to sing: It wastes your time and it angers the pig”

Steve Baier – Guru

ideas… people… packaging

Welcome Warren!

Cameron Christie Article

Share this Post

 

Ideon Increases Presence on Vancouver Island

This is Warren Smith. Like many Warren’s before him, this Warren is special. What makes this dashing, funny, beautiful Warren so special? He is Ideon’s new Sales Rep on Vancouver Island! Warren’s many years of packaging experience, along with Ideon’s exceptional quality and customer service, are sure to help all Island customers in fulfilling their packaging needs. Email warrens@ideonpackaging.com to get in touch.

Welcome to the Ideon Team, Warren!


Basics Before Innovation | AICC BoxScore

Cameron Christie Article

Share this Post

Innovate on the Basics, then try to Change the World


First Published Nov. 29th, 2016 at AICC BoxScore

Original Article

Box Manufacturing
“How often is your team being trained and retrained on the basics of corrugated?”Mike Nunn

What’s the next best thing? How do we continue to add value? When can we develop something innovative and groundbreaking?

These questions apply to more than just lean; they can be asked of the packaging industry or any business. With rapid advancements in technology, the drive to come up with new ideas, products, and solutions seems to be limitless. However, maybe a focus on the foundation and basics needs to be the top priority before trying to innovate. In the lean world, one of the toughest things to do during kaizen is develop a less wasteful process. To literally think outside the box, remove your existing paradigms of why something may or may not work, then partner with the stakeholders to come up with the third alternative (Covey reference) that is waste-free.

Find Your Focus

There are many proven lean tools and concepts to draw on—such as single piece flow and kanban—but it’s the focus on basics that is missing in many organizations. It is the complete understanding of the basics that will drive true kaizen, which is also what created those tried and true lean concepts and tools in the first place.

In lean, you can’t focus on learning advanced problem-solving tools like kata until you have the basic ability of seeing and measuring waste. However, all too often this is what I see and hear. Lean leaders and professionals are out learning new tools and going to more seminars, while back on the plant floor, only a select few people can identify all the forms of waste and give examples from their work area. Fundamentally, I believe this is wrong.

The original (yes, basic) forms of waste are: transportation, excess inventory, wasted motion, waiting, overproduction, overprocessing, and defects. There are people who would argue there are more forms of waste, but they’re just trying to innovate and be new. Basics … we’re talking about basics, man. Basics.

In the packaging world, you can’t design and manufacture an innovative new corrugated box without first understanding the basic characteristics of corrugated board. Moreover, you can’t ignore these basic characteristics either. Corrugated fundamentals need to be taught and retaught within our organizations. How often is your team being trained and retrained on the basics of corrugated? Hopefully, at least when they’re hired.

A Shared Vision

Beyond lean and packaging, the basics-focused mindset can apply to our businesses, too. Does everyone on your team truly know why you exist as a business, what your purpose is, and what your vision and mission are? Have you asked? In your business, these things should be considered the platform of decision. True north. The ultimate basics. Please don’t take it for granted that your team knows these basics.

Are you the best in your market/industry at your core business, or are you just one of many who is indistinguishable from your competition? Quality, customer service, speed to market, and people development are the basics you need to be focused on; be great at those things.

By the way, you’ll notice price wasn’t on my list. What if our energy were focused on the basics and doing everything with wow? What if we took all our energy and improved all the systems and processes that make our businesses tick? How good could your quality be? How fast could your lead time be? To what level could your customer service grow?

Tried and True

As an avid reader, I am always on the hunt for great business, leadership, or personal development books. To the contrary, I was recently listening to a talk by one of my favorite thought leaders on the topic of leadership and personal development, who talked about the desire for many people—like me—to continue reading new books in search of the next great book. However, this search for “new” can prevent you from truly absorbing, applying, and learning the fundamentals. He challenged the listener, instead of searching for the latest piece of development literature, to seek out the tried and true classics and read those books, then reread them and master them. I am on a mission right now to follow this advice by reading, again, the classics in my collection: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, How to Win Friends and Influence People, The Art of War, and a few others.

Most companies focus on being OK at the basics while pushing to innovate. I challenge you to innovate on the basics, then try to change the world.

Mike Nunn
VP | Operations

Halloween 2016 at Ideon

Cameron Christie Event

Share this Post

Thank you to our stellar Customer Service Team for such a spooktacular time on Halloween!

Congrats to Cory for winning the costume competition by dressing up as Cam, the Ideon technology guy and to Jessica for winning the “what’s in the box” challenge!

The Leadership Journey | AICC BoxScore

Cameron Christie Article

Share this Post

Starting the Journey to Become a Leader


First Published Sep. 28th, 2016 at AICC BoxScore

Original Article

Box Manufacturing
“It’s up to you. You’re the only person who can get yourself to where you want to be. You have to make the choices and chart the course, then be disciplined and persistent with the choices you make.”Mike Nunn

I recently had a tremendously rewarding experience occur at work, where a young employee approached me to ask about their candidacy for an open team-leader role that reports directly to me.

Although he was not ready for this specific role, I still interviewed him to give constructive feedback and encouraged him to start the journey to leadership. Two days later, I connected with him again on our plant floor to ask whether or how he had processed what we discussed. He thanked me and said he would own it.

In addition to our meeting, he asked that I email him my thoughts from the meeting so he could refer back to them as he worked to grow into a leader. Here is what I told him.

The biggest piece of advice I can give is to treat everyone the same—be one person. Start this now. If anyone ever gets—or already has—a feeling that you treat or communicate with different people differently, then your climb to leadership will be dead before you even get started. You need to interact with your superior and all other team members by showing the same respect, honesty, and openness—every time. This is integrity.

My Top Leadership Keys

Fail. Make informed decisions, but don’t be afraid to fail; it’s how you learn.

Reflect. Whether it went well or not, reflect on your results. Why did you get the result you did? What could you do differently next time?

Ask the right questions. Start with why, then how, and lastly, what. Why are you doing ______? How are you going to do _______? What needs to be done to achieve ________?

Set goals and expectations. Setting goals for yourself and your team is vital. Without goals, growth is left to chance and luck.

Think strategically. True leaders need to find better, newer, and less-wasteful systems and processes.

Be honest. Tell the truth, even if your voice shakes.

Learn. Never stop learning and acquiring knowledge; it’s the foundation for career growth.

Think positively. Don’t let the negativity of others affect your focus on positivity.

Serve. Leaders go first. They help their team achieve, and they lead by example.

Recommended Reading

Here is the list of books I recommended to this leadership understudy:

  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey. I’ve read this book four times and gotten something new from it each time.
  • The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy. As I was reading this book, I felt like Hardy was talking to me, about me.
  • The Leader Who Had No Title by Robin Sharma. You have more influence than you know. Harness mastery and achieve your greatness.
  • Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. Ten thousand hours … that’s how long it’s going to take. Take for what? Read the book.
  • The 4 Disciplines of Execution by Chris McChesney, Sean Covey, and Jim Huling. Goal-setting, improvement, and accountability simplified.
  • Start With Why by Simon Sinek. If you want to inspire, start with why.
  • Developing the Leader Within You by John C. Maxwell. After reading this book, I bought a copy for all my team leaders.

Shadow the people who are already in the place where you want to be. When shadowing a leader, ask lots of good questions, and be open to constructive feedback. I don’t know any leaders who wouldn’t be more than happy to share their experiences and spend time with someone eager to grow.

Lastly, I told him, “It’s up to you.” You’re the only person who can get yourself to where you want to be. You have to make the choices and chart the course, then be disciplined and persistent with the choices you make.

At the end of our conversation, I gave him some tangible first steps to make some immediate progress toward leadership. First, read all the books on the list. Second, shadow the leaders whose level you wish to achieve. Third, embody the character traits of great leaders. Lastly, be yourself and have fun.

Mike Nunn
VP | Operations

Ideon Featured on FreshGigs.ca!

Cameron Christie Article

Share this Post

Part of FreshGigs Creative Culture Series…


“In our Creative Cultures series, our writers spend a day inside companies to learn how hiring, onboarding and company culture play a role in employee happiness.

FreshGigs.ca


Crystal Henrickson, writer for FreshGigs, was welcomed to Ideon to immerse herself in the creative culture that has so long been the foundation of engagement at Ideon. From the CEO to the creative team, Crystal was able to experience how packaging is made from a people first perspective.

Ryan Kilthau | Graphics


“I love to see people succeed. It’s about unleashing the potential of the people here. I feel good about that.”Rick VanPoole | CEO

Article First Published at FreshGigs.ca


By Author: Crystal Henrickson

“…the spirit of giving back and uplifting others is woven through Ideon’s values.”Crystal Henrickson

Continue Reading at FreshGigs.ca…

Nutrition Strategies to Boost Your Immune System!

Cameron Christie Event

Share this Post


  • Adam_Hart_Presenting_3
  • Mike_Steve_Adam_Hart
  • Rick_One_Year_Lena
  • Adam_Hart_Townhall_Lunch
  • Adam_Hart_Front_Row
  • Adam_Hart_Presenting
  • Adam_Hart_Presenting_2
  • Power_Of_Food_Display
  • Ra_Energy_Bags
  • Adam_Talking
  • Adam_Hart_Talking_2
  • Rick_At_Adam_Hart

Special Presentation by Adam Hart

Exceptional turnout for Town Hall at Ideon Packaging

At this month’s Town Hall, Ideon packaging welcomed family, friends and customers to join the Ideon Team for lunch and a special presentation by Adam Hart. Adam inspired everyone by sharing his personal experiences of applying nutrition strategies to overcome the health and well-being obstacles that many of us too often face in our busy lives.

Ryan Kilthau | Graphics




7 Key Strategies to Boost Your Immune System & Eliminate Nutritional Stress

More than 70% of Your Immune System is in Your Gut…

  • Eat More Plants
  • Eat Your Liquids or Drink Your Food
  • Chew, Chew, Chew…
  • Breathe Between Bites
  • Make Water Your Friend
  • Supplement Key Vitamins
  • Take Your Food Outside

Adam Hart | The Power of Food


Learn more about Adam and his journey here > poweroffood.com

Stakeholders | AICC BoxScore

Cameron Christie Article

Share this Post

Stakeholders: The Key to Discovering the Root Cause


First Published Nov. 23rd, 2015 at AICC BoxScore
www.aiccboxscore.org/…

Box Manufacturing
More often than not, it’s the people doing the work who have the best ideas for improvement. All you need to do is ask them.Mike Nunn

When you redesigned the company’s ordering process, website, or forms, did you involve your customers? How about your customer service team?
The last time you did a setup reduction on your flexo-folder-gluer or rotary, did you involve the forklift or prepress teams?

How about your design request queue? Has the sales team had any input?

Heavily rooted in the foundation of a sustainable lean journey is the purposeful involvement of all stakeholders. Involvement takes many forms. It can mean:

Asking various people for help discovering the root cause when a problem happens, instead of thinking you have all the answers.

“More often than not, it’s the people doing the work who have the best ideas for improvement. All you need to do is ask them.”

Fostering a no-blame environment by looking to the process, not the individual, when defects occur.

Ensuring you have identified all affected parties when making a change, then giving everyone, or at least every team, an opportunity to participate in a meaningful capacity.
Asking good questions when doing your Gemba Walks—during both prosperous and challenging times. Questions such as: “If you could wave a magic wand and fix one thing in our company right now, what would it be?” Then follow that up with, “If it were up to you to fix this, how would you do it?”

It can be easy to get caught in the trap of thinking you have the best answer—especially if you’re the manager, because isn’t that why you’re a manager in the first place? But more often than not, it’s the people doing the work who have the best ideas for improvement. All you need to do is ask them.

Leadership and management play the biggest role in making people feel like they’re being heard. Involving stakeholders doesn’t mean just inviting people to a meeting; true lean involvement is encouraging them to participate, listening to their ideas, asking great questions, and following up on ideas.

Whenever you are creating or changing a process, it is imperative that you seek the people who are on the front lines and doing the value-added work. I’ve been involved in a number of Kaizen events where an amazing solution or idea came from someone who, under nonlean circumstances, may not have even been included on the team.

Everyone, from the CEO to the person you just hired to tail a flexo, has the ability to make great change in your company. Do you have the environment and culture to bring the ideas to the surface? If not, it’s time to start engaging your stakeholders.
Be continuous improvement!

Mike Nunn
Director of Operations

Ideon Welcomes Adam Hart!

Cameron Christie Event

Share this Post

Surprise Guest Speaker

the “How-to-guy” for living with more energy…Adam Hart
Ideon Packaging’s monthly Town Hall finally outgrew the lunchroom and was, by necessity of attendance, moved to the plant floor this afternoon. The event was punctuated by guest speaker Adam Hart, best-selling author of “The Power of Food.” A local from Squamish, Adam has become widely known as the “How-to-guy” for living with more energy without giving up the foods you love”.


The Power of Food

Every Ideon Team Member received a copy of Adam Hart’s recent best-seller today as a pertinent kick-off for what is anticipated to be an upcoming year of personal health and well-being development guided by none-other than Adam himself. A big thanks to Rick Van Poele for committing such a strong investment to the Ideon Team!

Ryan Kilthau | Graphics


Learn more about Adam and his journey here > poweroffood.com